Monday, June 30, 2014

Oregon Berries are here!!!

We are very excited to announce that our first shipment of berries have arrived!
FRESH FROM OREGON!

You can buy these berries beginning tomorrow, Wednesday July 2nd.
Just call (208) 329-9837
Here is a little information about the differences between these berries:

marionberries: The Marionberry is a blackberry with medium to large fruit, they are longer than wide.  There are only a handful of areas in the world where marionberries thrive and Oregon's Willamette Valley, known as the Caneberry (marionberry) Capitol of the World, offers the most favorable of all climates.  (read more...)


blackberries: Blackberries were perceived by the ancient cultures as being a wild plant, and historical accounts for a backyard culture of blackberry bushes are few. The Greeks used the blackberry as a remedy for Gout, and the Romans made a tea from the leaves of the blackberry plant to treat various illnesses. (read more...)

blueberries: For centuries, blueberries were gathered from the forests and the bogs by Native Americans and consumed fresh and also preserved. The Northeast Native American tribes revered blueberries and much folklore developed around them. The blossom end of each berry, the calyx, forms the shape of a perfect five-pointed star; the elders of the tribe would tell of how the Great Spirit sent "star berries" to relieve the children's hunger during a famine. Parts of the blueberry plant were also used as medicine. A tea made from the leaves of the plant was thought to be good for the blood. Blueberry juice was used to treat coughs. (read more....)

boysenberries: The Boysenberry was developed during the Great Depression by Rudolf Boysen, a Swedish immigrant. His first plant to bear fruit was in 1923. The Boysenberry would find commercial success under the development of farmer and berry "expert" Walter Knott of Knott's Berry Farm. The Boysenberry's popularity is the single most reason for making Knott's Berry Farm so famous. Boysenberries grow as trailing vines throughout the Western Coast of the United States and they have been naturalized in Northern New Zealand, where the fruit is grown for commercial export more than anywhere else in the world. 

Raspberries: What makes the raspberry so special? For one thing, it's a superfood, meaning it has a nutritional value that’s top-notch. Raspberries contain significant amounts of vitamin C and folate as well as the minerals potassium, calcium, manganese, and magnesium. Also found in raspberries is the antioxidant anthocyanin, which gives the berries their red color and helps control diabetes and slow the effects of aging. Besides all that, raspberries boast a healthy dose of ellagic acid, a powerful cancer-fighting substance, and fiber - a cupful provides about eight grams.

Join us this Saturday at the Market!
And be sure to stop by and get a sample of these delicious berries!


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